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Our Mission

Recovery Communities of North Carolina (RCNC) is a nonprofit organization and our mission is to promote addiction recovery, wellness and citizenship through advocacy, education and support.

 

  • People Helped via Recovery Support & Services
    People Helped via Recovery Support & Services

    10000

  • Volunteer Hours to Empower Community
    Volunteer Hours to Empower Community

    5000

  • Dollars Raised to Support Recovery
    Dollars Raised to Support Recovery

    150,000

  • Statewide Trainings & Educational Offerings
    Statewide Trainings & Educational Offerings

    180

The pandemic is having a significant impact on people with a substance use disorder who are in the early stages of addiction recovery, says author and motivational speaker Eric Gremminger. People in the early steps of addiction recovery depend upon the support of peers and groups to stay sober, and those support measures are threatened during a quarantine, Gremminger said. That stress only multiplies when one is unable to work and struggles to make ends meet financially, as well as being isolated in a home with a family that doesn’t understand the needs of someone in addiction recovery.

For the 16 million people globally and 3 million people in the U.S. suffering from opioid use disorder (OUD), COVID-19 brings a slew of issues: lack of face-to-face counseling services, methadone clinic shutdown and increased mortality risk from coronavirus from underlying respiratory damage.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and as stress and anxiety are at all-time highs due to the added emotional weight of the coronavirus pandemic, we compiled our very best mental health advice -- all spliced into easy-to-digest sections on burnout, anxiety and sleep, plus the benefits of meditation, physical activity and getting outdoors. We hope this helps you navigate any mental health troubles or emotional distress you may be dealing with at this time.